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    | Doosan Babcock

    'Tap into the UK's female talent pool', say engineers

    New research commissioned by UK-based engineering firm Doosan Babcock has revealed that 43% of girls are currently or planning to study a maths, science or technology (STEM) subject at college or sixth form, and 30% would like to learn more about jobs in energy and engineering at school. With just 6%* of engineering professionals being female, tapping into this pool of qualified talent would represent a significant boost to the industry.

    Girls are eager to learn more about the engineering career opportunities available in the energy sector, with 33% saying that both businesses and schools should provide students with more information. Almost a quarter believe that they would be more likely to consider a career in the sector if they simply knew more about it (22%).

    Perceptions of the industry may also go some way to explain the lack of females pursuing engineering careers following their studies. Only 14% of girls believe it could be exciting to be an engineer in the energy sector and more than half of girls (52%) feel the sector is “male-dominated”. Awareness is also clearly lacking - while 71% of girls have a good understanding of what a career in retail entails, just 17% understood what an engineering job in the energy sector involves.

    Doosan Babcock is calling on the entire industry to raise awareness amongst young women about the availability and nature of jobs in the sector.

    In a move to inspire the next generation of female talent, Doosan Babcock has set up an ambassador programme which sees its female rising stars travel to events across the country, including this week’s Big Bang Fair, to share their insights and offer tips about the best routes into an engineering career

    Samantha Thompson, Lifting Engineer, Doosan Babcock:“People are often surprised when I tell them what I do for a living as the industry is very male-dominated. I’d really like to see more young women working in the sector.“I’m sure if more people realised the satisfaction that comes with these interesting roles, we’d start to see a surge of great candidates no matter what gender!”

    Martyn Fletcher, Director of Doosan Babcock’s Asset Support Group and leader of the company’s apprenticeship programme, said:“As a country we are short of skills - so to restrict ourselves to a small percentage of the population is simply not advisable. As an industry we need to make sure we have access to as many skilled and talented people as we can to deliver growth across the sector.“It is very pleasing to see that girls are taking an interest in STEM as they represent a crucial part of the UK’s engineering future.”

    Andrew Hunt, CEO of Doosan Babcock, said:“The energy sector clearly needs to work much harder to attract young UK talent and overcome the perception that the industry lacks excitement and creativity. Engineering businesses working in the energy sector must play their part, engage with as many young people as possible and highlight the vast number of rewarding careers the sector has to offer them.”

    Notes to Editors:
    All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 1,000 14-18 year olds (UK). Fieldwork was undertaken between 17th - 24th October 2014. The survey was carried out online.

    * Royal Academy of Engineering analysis of the Labour Force Survey, 2004-10, quoted in Diversity Data, RAEng, 20



    'Tap into the UK's female talent pool', say engineers 'Tap into the UK's female talent pool', say engineers

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